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The *Man With the Golden GunThe *Spy Who Loved Me
MoonrakerFor Your Eyes Only
Description
James Bond 007 Soundtracks 9-12

The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 9-12 in the series are "The Man With the Golden Gun" (1974, theme song performed by Lulu), "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977, theme song performed by Carly Simon), "Moonraker" (1979, theme song performed by Shirley Bassey), and "For Your Eyes Only" (1981, theme song performed by Sheena Easton).

Mainstream Soundtracks
Mega, pop-culture movie soundtracks both mirror and influence the zeitgeist of the day. The most successful of the soundtracks go beyond just incidental music and include music key to the films' plots.

Cult Soundtracks
Skewed from the mainstream soundtrack blockbusters, cult soundtracks boast a stubbornly loyal and decidely non-mainstream following. Who can forget one's first midnight showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show?

Movie Soundtracks with Religious Themes
Examples of soundtracks with a religious theme include "Godspell", "Jesus Christ Superstar", "Joseph and the Technicolor Dreamcoat", and "The Last Temptation of Christ".

Spinal Tap
The 1984 mock, rock documentary written by Rob Reiner chronicles the adventures of the British heavy metal band, Spinal Tap, in the midst of their first American tour. The irony of the soundtrack and songs such as "Big Bottom" and "Stonehenge" is that they work better than the songs they parody. In 1990, a studio-only album with the same cast of characters assembled for "Break Like the Wind" to give fans another foul whiff of music.

A Folk-Pop Mocumentary
From the writers behind "Spinal Tap," "Waiting for Gufman" and "Best of Show" comes "A Mighty Wind" - a movie spoof of early '60s folk singers. The film revolves around a reunion of three fictitious folk acts from the '60s. The highly polished acts in the movie are the Folksman, Mitch & Mickey, and the New Main Street Singers. The fictitious groups call to mind real groups of the time such as The New Christy Minstrels, The Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul and Mary among others.

1970s Disaster Movies
The 1970s kicked off with the granddaddy of all disaster films, 1970's "Airport." It was followed by 1972's ocean disaster, "The Poseidon Adventure" and 1974's high rise disaster "The Towering Inferno." For both of the latter movies, Maureen McGovern was tapped to sing the theme songs, "Morning After" and "We May Never Love Like This Again," respectively, which won Oscars. McGovern also preformed "Can You Read My Mind?": the love theme from Superman.

Dancer in the Dark
A Cannes Film Festival favorite in 2000, "Dancer in the Dark" starred Bjork as Selma, a factory worker on the verge of going blind. She escapes her depressing everyday existence through elaborate musical dreams. "Selmasongs" contains music from the motion picture and includes the duet "I've Seen It All" with Radiohead’s lead singer Thom Yorke.

Ian Fleming's Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
The British novelist Ian Fleming (1909-1964) is well known for his James Bond series written in the '50s and '60s and made into the popular spy films. Fleming also wrote "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car" in 1964. The Walt Disney adaptation of the movie in 1968 is a one of the most requested titles in the MGM catalog.

Virgin Suicides, The
The dark fairy tale film of suburban teenhood, "The Virigin Suicides" is based on Jeffrey Eugenide's 1993 novel. The story centers on the mysterious and tragic world of the five Lisbon sisters. The soundtrack featured rock music mostly of the '70s. The French duo, Air, released a soundtrack to the film as well with their trademark laid-back and atmospheric sound.

Janis Joplin and the Rose
Bette Midler's star feature, 1979's "The Rose" was loosely based on the life of Janis Joplin, a powerful rock and blues singer of the late '60s. Joplin died of a heroin overdose in 1970. In the movie "The Rose," Midler stars as Rose, a singer self-destructing under the pressures of her hectic music lifestyle and indulging in drugs and alcohol to escape. The film includes the self-titled track that went on to become a huge hit in 1980.

Movies Based on Women Musicians
There have been a handful of movies chronicling the life of famous woman musicians. Diana Ross plays Billie Holliday in 1972's "Lady Sings the Blues" based on the life of the popular jazz singer. Bette Midler plays Rose in 1979's "The Rose" based on the life of Janis Joplin. Jennifer Lopez plays the famous Tejano singer, Selena, murdered by her fan club president, in 1997's "Selena." Mariah Carey plays herself in the semi-autobiographical 2001 "Glitter."

Harder They Come, The
1973's movie and soundtrack "The Harder They Come" was one a key event in the introduction of reggae to American audiences. This Jamaican cult classic starred singer/songwriter Jimmy Cliff as an impoverished guy trying to make it in the ghettoes of Trenchtown and dancehalls of Kingston. Besides Cliff, the soundtrack also featured contributions by The Maytals, The Slickers and others.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band – The Movie
While always a daunting task to interpret a classic, nonetheless, director Robert Stigwood decided to mount a musical version of the Beatles' classic 1967 "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band." Stigwood was hoping to duplicate the success he had with "Saturday Night Fever" (1977) and "Grease" (1978). Unfortunately, the 1978 Sgt. Pepper adaptation was a critical and commercial flop. The movie starred Peter Frampton as Billy Shears and includes contributions from the Bee Gees, Aerosmith and George Burns among others.

The Lord of the Rings Series
The Lord of the Ring movies were a critically acclaimed and much loved series released in 2001-2003. The series featured three installments, each with its own soundtrack composed by Howard Shore and one song by a featured vocalist. On the first soundtrack "May It Be" features Enya. On the second soundtrack "Gollum's Song" features Iceland's Emilianna Torrini. On the third soundtrack "Into the West" features Annie Lennox.

The Qatsi Trilogy
The Hopi-inspired, Qatsi film trilogy examines the rapid transition from the natural order to a world dominated by human culture and technology. Director Godfrey Reggio's uses stunning, non-narrative visuals to examine and critique the transition. Key to the success of the trilogy is the minimalist soundtracks by Philip Glass. The trilogy includes 1983's "Koyaanisqatsi" (examining humans' impact on the environment), 1988's "Powaqqatsi" (examining the exploitation of 3rd world cultures) and 2002's "Nagoyqatsi" (examining the impact of technology in our culture). All three titles are taken from the Hopi language. "Koyaanisqatsi" translates to "life out of balance." "Powaqqatsi" translates roughly to "someone living at the expense of others." "Nagoyqatsi" translates to "war as a way of life."

The Fog of War
The 2003 documentary, "The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons From the Life of Robert S. McNamara," features Robert McNamara (1916- ) the secretary of defense for the Kennedy (1961-1963) and Johnson (1963-1969) administrations and later president of the World Bank. In the film, by director Errol Morris, McNamara talks about the tragedies and glories of the 20th century including McNamara's involvement in the Cuban Missile crisis and Vietnam War. The term "fog of war" alludes to the lack of clear information leading up to conflicts. The score of the film is provided by Philip Glass.

Neil Young's Movie "Greendale"
Canadian rocker Neil Young's produced, directed, screen wrote and composed the soundtrack for the 2003 movie "Greendale." The film and soundtrack are designed to be an interconnected song cycle. The concept revolves around an extended family in a small town called Greendale and how they are torn apart by a murder. The film also touches on themes of saving the earth and the erosion of individual rights. This is not Young's first feature film; he was involved in a number of films since the 1970s. He often uses the pseudonym of Bernard Shakey in movie credits.

Zero Patience: A Musical About AIDS
The 1993 film "Zero Patience: A Musical About AIDS" is about the ghost of Zero – "patient zero" – who allegedly brought the HIV virus responsible for AIDS to Canada. The film is a musical, love story (between Zero and Sir Richard Burton) and exploration of homophobia in the wake of the AIDS crisis. The first case of AIDS occurred in the USA in 1981. Eventually, it became clear that the HIV virus was responsible for AIDS and that it was transmitted by sexual contact, blood transfers and drug use. The role of international travel in the spread of HIV was highlighted by the case of the Canadian flight attendant Gaetan Dugas – patient zero. Several early cases of AIDS revealed that the infected individuals were either direct or indirect sexual contacts of the flight attendant. Dugas died of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS in 1984.

James Bond 007 Soundtracks 1-4
The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 1-4 in the series are "Dr. No" (1962, no theme song), "From Russia With Love" (1963, theme song performed by Matt Munro), "Goldfinger" (1964, theme song performed by Shirley Bassey), and "Thunderball" (1965, theme song performed by Tom Jones).

James Bond 007 Soundtracks 5-8
The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 5-8 in the series are "You Only Live Twice" (1967, theme song performed by Nancy Sinatra), "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969, theme song performed by Louis Armstrong), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971, theme song performed by Shirley Bassey), and "Live and Let Die" (1973, theme song performed by Paul McCartney and Wings).

James Bond 007 Soundtracks 9-12
The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 9-12 in the series are "The Man With the Golden Gun" (1974, theme song performed by Lulu), "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977, theme song performed by Carly Simon), "Moonraker" (1979, theme song performed by Shirley Bassey), and "For Your Eyes Only" (1981, theme song performed by Sheena Easton).

James Bond 007 Soundtracks 13-16
The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 13-16 in the series are "Octopussy" (1983, theme song performed by Rita Coolidge), "A View to a Kill" (1985, theme song performed by Duran Duran), "The Living Daylights" (1987, theme song performed by A-Ha), and "License to a Kill" (1989, theme song performed by Gladys Knight).

James Bond 007 Soundtracks 17-20
The James Bond spy saga is one of the most successful and longest running film cycles. The story was originally conceived of by Ian Fleming (1909-1964). The character of James Bond first debuted in the 1952 novel "Casino Royale." The first movie was released in 1962. Over the course of the next 40 years and over 20 films, several composers have been responsible for creating the 007 spy soundtracks including John Barry, George Martin, Marvin Hamlisch, and Bill Conti. Each film soundtrack (except the first) contains a theme song sung by a pop star popular at the time of the film's release. Movies 17-20 in the series are "GoldenEye" (1995, theme song performed by Tina Turner), "Tomorrow Never Knows" (1997, theme song performed by Sheryl Crow), "The World is Not Enough" (1999, theme song performed by Garbage), and "Die Another Day" (2002, theme song performed by Madonna).

Shirley Bassey and James Bond 007 Theme Songs
Shirley Bassey has sung the most theme songs to James Bond soundtracks including "Goldfinger" (1964), "Diamonds are Forever" (1971), and "Moonraker" (1979). The James Bond 007 film cycle started with 1962's "Dr. No." Bassey was one of the most popular female vocalists in Britain during the late 1950s and early 1960s. She is originally from Cardiff, Wales and is nicknamed the "Tigress of Tiger Bay" after Cardiff's port known as Tiger Bay. Besides the James Bond theme songs, Bassey is also known for her renditions of contemporary pop songs in which she creates her own distinctive versions in her own dramatic style and big, brassy voice.
Associated Albums
The *Man With the Golden Gun The *Spy Who Loved Me Moonraker For Your Eyes Only
Further Exploration
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