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Description
Roger Dean Album Covers

Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Osibisa's "Osibisa" (1971), Asia's "Aura" (2001), and Greenslade's "Greenslade" (1973) and "Bedside Manners are Optional" (1973).

Mapplethorpe Covers, Robert
Mapplethorpe (1946-1989) designed a number of album covers starting with the Patti Smith 1975 album, "Horses." He typically photographed his subjects with interesting natural lighting or shadow effects.

Liebowitz Album Covers, Annie
The American photographer Annie Leibovitz is known for her iconic portraits of celebrities. A number of album covers feature her work which typically captures some aspect of the artist's public persona. Examples include Bruce Springsteen on "Born in the U.S.A.," Cyndi Lauper on "True Colors," Mick Jagger on "Wandering Spirit" and Patti Smith on "Gone Again."

Roger Dean Album Covers - Yes and Asia
Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Yes' "Fragile" (1972) and "Relayer" (1974) and Asia's "Alpha" (1983) and "Astra" (1985).

Hipgnosis Designed Album Covers
Hipgnosis was the British design studio (1968-1983) behind some of the most innovative album covers in rock history. The studio's principal members were Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell. The designs from the studio were typically produced in photographic media, often in conjunction with graphic designers and illustrators. Examples of Hipgnosis covers include Peter Gabriel's second solo release, Alan Parson's "I Robot," 10CC's "Deceptive Bends" and Led Zeppelin's "Houses of the Holy."

Hipgnosis Designed Album Covers
Hipgnosis was the British design studio (1968-1983) behind some of the most innovative album covers in rock history. The studio's principal members were Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell. The designs from the studio were typically produced in photographic media, often in conjunction with graphic designers and illustrators. Examples of Hipgnosis covers include classic Pink Floyd album covers from the 1970s.

George Hunter and Globe Propaganda
George Hunter and his Globe Propaganda design firm were responsible for three '60s album covers demonstrating "Americana" style. Hunter was the lead singer of the Charlatans for a short while in the '60s.

Lloyd and Airbrushing, Peter
The mid '70s were the golden age of airbrush art. This is reflected in several album covers of the time illustrated by artist Peter Lloyd. Lloyd went on to work on digital effects for the film "Tron."

Saville and the Factory Designs, Peter
Peter Saville was a designer for the Factory label. His designs revolutionized the look of music packaging starting in the late '70s. In particular, he is associated with Joy Division and New Order cover designs.

Little Feat Album Cover Design
Neon Park (1940-1993), aka Martin Muller, was the free spirited California designer responsible for a number of surreal and humorous album covers of the '70s boogie rockers, Little Feat. In particular, his design for their 1972 effort "Salin' Shoes" with a piece of cake on a swing is one of the most memorable album covers of the '70s. The location of the missing piece raised a few eyebrows upon its release.

Peter Max Cover Art
Peter Max is an artist that was part of the Pop Art movement which emerged in the 1950s and continued into the '60s and '70s. Pop Art celebrates the everyday and mass-produced – often drawing inspiration from media and advertising. After 1970, Max focused almost exclusively on developing his distinctive painting style found on album covers for Nicolette Larson, The Band, Badfinger and Aretha Franklin. Maxed served as an artist for the Grammy's and was the painter of the "40 Gorbys," an homage to Mikhail Gorbachov.

Peter Blake Album Covers
The father of the British pop movement, artist Peter Blake, helped orchestrate the famous Beatles' cover for their 1967 "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band." The collage features the foursome among their heroes including dignitaries, friends, actors and even wax models of themselves! Blake also designed the Who's 1981 "Face Dances," Paul Weller's 1995 "Stanley Road" and illustrated Eric Clapton's 1991 "24 Nights."

Physical Graffiti and Some Girls
Both the 1975 Led Zeppelin album "Physical Graffiti" and the 1978 Rolling Stones' album "Some Girls" cover designs involved artist Peter Corriston. Both were complex productions that had sliding sleeves with windows revealing different characters. The photo for the Zeppelin album is a New York apartment in whose windows a gallery of eclectic celebrities is shown. On "Some Girls" as similar concept is used, however, images of famous people were replaced with band members in wigs due to copyright issues.

Greg Gorman Album Covers
Along with Herb Ritts and Annie Leibowitz, Greg Gorman is ranked as one of the leading modern portrait and celebrity photographers. He has been photographing stage, film and music personalities since the late 1960s when he began taking photos at rock concerts. His philosophy is that life itself is art is unmistakable. Some of the album covers featuring his work include Elton John's "Made in England" (1995), Bette Midler's "Some People's Lives" (1990), Barbra Streisand's "Memories" (1981) and Dweezil Zappa's "Havin' a Bad Day" (1986).

Hipgnosis Designed Album Covers
Hipgnosis was the British design studio (1968-1983) behind some of the most innovative album covers in rock history. The studio's principal members were Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell. The designs from the studio were typically produced in photographic media, often in conjunction with graphic designers and illustrators. Examples of Hipgnosis covers include Yes' 1978 "Tormato," the Scorpions' 1979 "Lovedrive," Rainbow's 1981 "Difficult to Cure" and Paul McCartney's 1982 "Tug of War."

Shusei Nagaoka Cover Art
The Japanese born, US-based artist, Shusei Nagaoka, designed a number of albums in the mid to late '70s and early '80s. His style is reminiscent of Roger Dean with it emphasis on illustrated, fantastical and futuristic landscapes. Examples of Nagaoka’s work includes Jefferson Starship’s 1976 "Spitfire," Electric Light Orchestra's 1977 "Out of the Blue," Earth, Wind and Fire’s 1979 "I Am" and Deep Purple’s 1979 "When We Rock, We Rock and When We Roll, We Roll."

Shusei Nagaoka Cover Art
The Japanese born, US-based artist, Shusei Nagaoka, designed a number of albums in the mid to late '70s and early '80s. His style is reminiscent of Roger Dean with it emphasis on illustrated, fantastical and futuristic landscapes. Besides illustrating covers for more well known artists like Jefferson Starship and Earth, Wind and Fire, Nagaoka created illustrations for the covers for these two lesser known albums: Munich Machine's 1977 "Munich Machine" and Parlet's 1978 "Pleasure Principle."

Annie Liebowitz Album Covers - Women
The American photographer Annie Leibovitz is known for her iconic portraits of celebrities. A number of album covers feature her work which typically captures some aspect of the artist's public persona. In particular, her photos of women musicians portray strong, confident women at the top of their professions. Examples include Dolly Parton’s "Halos and Horns," Judy Collins' "Judy Sings Dylan ... ," Barbra Streisand's "Timeless" and Ella Fitzgerald's "Things Ain't What They Used to Be."

Robert Mapplethorpe’s Patti Smith Covers
The controversial photographer Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989) designed a number of album covers starting in the mid ‘70s starting with friend (and one-time lover) Patti Smith’s 1975 album, "Horses." He also photographed Smith for the cover of two more of her albums: "Wave" (1979) and "Dream of Life" (1988). Mapplethorpe typically photographed his subjects with interesting natural lighting or shadow effects. He would go on to produce photographs of human anatomy and extreme sexual situations that made him a favorite target of conservatives in the 1980’s.

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritts' work featuring a diverse range of musicians including Brian McKnight, Puff Daddy, James Taylor and Prince.

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritts' work featuring a diverse range of musicians including Jody Watley, Tina Turner, Diana Ross and Cher.

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritt's work featuring male musicians: Harry Connick Jr.'s "25" (1992), Corey Hart's "The Singles" (1992), Steve Winwood's "Roll With It" (1988) and Kenny G's "Paradise" (2002).

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritt's work featuring male musicians: Don Henley's "Building the Perfect Beast" (1984), Corey Hart's "Young Man Running" (1989), Joe Cocker's "Ultimate Collection" (2004) and Billy Idol's "Whiplash Smile" (1986).

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritt's work featuring female musicians: Olivia Newton John "Physical" (1981), Madonna's "True Blue" (1986), Belinda Carlisle's "Runaway Horses" (1989) and Gloria Estefan's "Destiny" (1996).

Herb Ritts Photography
Herb Ritts (1952-2002) began to take portraits of friends in the mid 1970s as a hobby. The self-taught photographer's professional career took off after photographing then-upcoming actor Richard Gere in the late 1970s. In the 1980s, Ritts continued to build his reputation as a celebrity portraitist and worked as well in fashion photography and produced album covers and music videos. One of the common themes of Ritts' work is the nude. While not nude, the following album covers are examples of Ritt's work: Janet Jackson's "Design of a Decade" (1995), Elton John's "Sleeping with the Past" (1989) and Wilson Phillips' "Shadows & Light" (1992).

Barry Jackson Cover Art
After having established a reputation as a record album and movie poster artist in the 80's, Barry Jackson began working as a production designer and visual development artists in movies in the early 1990's. Some of his futuristic and fantastical designs can be seen on album covers like Dio's 1984 "Last Line," Neil Young's 1983 "Trans," ZZ Top's 1985 "Afterburner" and The Band's 1996 "High on the Hog."

Frank Frazetta Album Covers
Dark, epic, fantastical and heroic are some of the ways of describing the album covers by renowned artist Frank Frazetta. Frazetta started out in comics illustration in the 1950s. In the mid 1960s Frazetta began painting and specifically became closely aligned with science fiction art. In pop/rock music, Frazetta's style is most closely associated with the covers of the hard rockers Molly Hatchet and appears on "Molly Hatchet" (1978), "Flirtin' With Disaster" (1979) and "Beatin' the Odds" (1980). Frazetta's work also appears on Nazareth's 1977 "Expect No Mercy" and Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force's 2000 "War to End All Wars."

Robert Crumb
Cartoonist, Robert Crumb (1943- ), is one of the most talked-album cartoonists of the 20th century. Controversial, underground, anarchist are just a few of the terms typically used when talking about Crumb. His cartoon, Fritz the Cat, featured America's first X-rated animated character and his "Keep On Truckin'" image is a cultural icon. His "bigfoot" design style can be seen a number of album covers including Big Brother and the Holding Company's 1968 "Cheap Thrills," Earl Hooker's 1972 "There's a Fungus Amung Us," Blind Boy Fuller's 1978 "Truckin' My Blues" and the 1992 compilation "Please Warm My Weiner: Old Time Hokum Blues."

Laura Levine Artwork: Verve Jazz Series
Laura Levine is cross-disciplinary visual artist who has worked in filmmaking, photography, fine art and illustration. From 1980 to 1995, Levine worked as a music photographer where her work appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Rocker and Sounds UK. She was commissioned by Verve Records in 1992 for their Essential Series on Jazz to produce album cover illustrations. The four female jazz artists she depicted are Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Billie Holiday and Dinah Washington.

Laura Levine Artwork: Verve Jazz Series
Laura Levine is cross-disciplinary visual artist who has worked in filmmaking, photography, fine art and illustration. From 1980 to 1995, Levine worked as a music photographer where her work appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Rocker and Sounds UK. She was commissioned by Verve Records in 1992 for their Essential Series on Jazz to produce album cover illustrations. The four male jazz artists she depicted include Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, Louis Armstrong and Stan Getz.

Laura Levine Artwork
Laura Levine is cross-disciplinary visual artist who has worked in filmmaking, photography, fine art and illustration. From 1980 to 1995, Levine worked as a music photographer where her work appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Rocker and Sounds UK. She was commissioned by Verve Records in 1992 for their Essential Series on Jazz to produce series of album cover illustrations. In addition to those covers, Levine also created cover artwork for Richard Thompson's 1991 "Rumour and Sigh" and Leo Kottke's 1990 "That's What."

Lynn Goldsmith Album Cover Photography
Lynn Goldsmith is a portrait photographer whose work has appeared in magazines such as Life, Newsweek, Time, Rollingstone and many others. Her subjects include entertainment personalities, sport stars, authors and film directors. Goldsmith varied career includes time as a recording artist under the name Will Powers where she released the 1983 album "Dancing for Mental Health." Goldsmith's work photographic work appears on a number of album covers including Frank Zappa's 1979 "Sheik Yerbouti," Brian Adams' 1981 "You Want It, You Got It," The Waterboys' 1985 "This is the Sea" and the Todd Rundgren 2002 compilation "The Essentials: Todd Rundgren."

Roger Dean Album Covers
Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Asia's "Asia" (1982), Lighthouse's "Best of Lighthouse" (1976), Yes' "Tales from Topographic Oceans" (1974), and Dave Greenslade's "Cactus Choir" (1976).

Roger Dean Album Covers
Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Osibisa's "Osibisa" (1971), Asia's "Aura" (2001), and Greenslade's "Greenslade" (1973) and "Bedside Manners are Optional" (1973).

Roger Dean Album Covers
Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Budgie's "Squawk" (1972) and "Never Turn Your Back on a Friend" (1973) and Steve Howe's "Beginnings" (1975) and "The Steve Howe Album" (1979).

Roger Dean Album Covers
Roger Dean is the artist behind a number of the striking albums covers for Yes and Asia as well as other artists. His designs are often fantastical, colorful, and evocative of other worldly landscapes. Examples of albums featuring Roger Dean cover artwork include Steve Howe's "Turbulence" (1991) and "Elements" (2003) and Uriah Heep's "Demons and Wizards" (1972) and "The Magician's Birthday" (1972).

The Art of Shel Silverstein (1930-1999)
Shelby Allan "Shel" Silverstein (1930-1999) was an eclectic American poet, songwriter, musician, composer, and writer to name just a few of his talents. His beloved (and mildly controversial to some) children's literature includes "A Light in the Attic," "Where the Sidewalk Ends," "The Giving Tree," and "Runny Babbit." Another facet of the multi-talented Silverstein is his quirky contributions to rock music. Hits he wrote include "Cover of the Rollin' Stone" and "Sylvia's Mother" for Dr. Hook and "A Boy Named Sue" famously performed by Johnny Cash in his concert at San Quentin. Several albums based on his books feature Silverstein's artwork: "Where the Sidewalk Ends" (1976), "A Light in the Attic" (1985), and "Underwater Land" (2002) with Pat Dailey.
Associated Albums
Osibisa Aura Greenslade Bedside Manners are Extra
Further Exploration
http://www.rogerdean.com/
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