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Description
The 2001 Presidential Inauguration

George W Bush, the 43rd president of the United States was sworn into office on January 20, 2001. During his election campaign, Bush made much of his Texan roots. One of the hottest tickets of the inauguration festivities was the inauguration eve "Black Tie and Boots Ball." Artists featured at the event included Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Asleep at the Wheel and Lyle Lovett.

Songs Mentioning Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan inspired his fair share of songs - usually negative - including Simply Reds' "Money's Too Tight," Frankie Goes to Hollywood's "Two Tribes" and gracing the cover of Wasted Youth's "Reagan's In."

Presidential Campaign Songs
Every presidential campaign has a theme song. Some have clever titles like "Get on a Raft With Taft" (for 27th president William H. Taft), but most are obscure Folk artist Oscar Brand covers every campaign song, from Washington to Bush with just a guitar in hand.

Capitol Steps: Political Parody
The political parody outfit, the Capitol Steps, is a troupe of current and former Congressional staffers. Since the mid '80s no administration, be it Republican or Democrat, is safe from their scrutiny of events and personalities in Capitol Hill and around the world.

Tattoos
Tattoos were once considered only acceptable for the working class. At the turn of the millennium, tattoos could be found in all walks of society. One of the first album covers to prominently feature tattoos is Supertramp's second album, the 1970 "Indelibly Stampled." It featured the tattooed breasts of model Marian Hollier who was reported to have been paid 45 pounds for the photo. Examples of other album covers featuring tattoos include The Rolling Stones' 1981 "Tattoo You," Foo Fighters' 1999 "There is Nothing Left to Lose," and Sublime's 1996 "Sublime."

Rave Scene, The
Flourishing in the late '80s and early '90s, "raves" or underground parties held in abandoned warehouses or open fields, featured acid house and hardcore music. Raves were a phenomenon primarily in England, later in the U.S., and attracted a lot of attention because of the large quantities of drugs taken to heighten the experience – in particular, the new and chilling drug of the time, ecstasy.

Post 9/11 Song Selection
After 9/11, the U.S. communications behemoth, Clear Channel Communications, was reported to have sent a list of 150 songs to its thousands of radio stations. The songs on the list were considered to be inappropriate for the national mental health as they either portrayed explicit violence or had themes reminiscent of the recent tragedy. The songs selected spanned many genres and decades of popular music. Clear Channel did not deny that such a list existed, and the idea of a banned list went down as an urban legend. Included on the (alleged) list were Neil Diamond's "America," James Taylor's "Fire and Rain" and the Clash's "Rock the Casbah."

Blur Recording Heads to Mars, A
The neighboring "red" planet, Mars, has fascinated humankind for centuries and was first visited in 1965 by the U.S. craft, Mariner 4. On June 5, 2003 the European Space Agency launched a probe toward Mars called "Mars Express." The Britpop band Blur composed a musical refrain to act as a call signal if the landing vehicle called the "Beagle 2" landed successfully. The Beagle was scheduled to land on Mars on December 25, 2003.

Arnold Schwarzenegger's Unofficial Campaign Song
The 2003 California governor recall and subsequent election of film star Arnold Schwarzenegger to the post was a highly controversial political event. Schwarzenegger's campaign built on voter frustration with the status quo and looming state budget deficits. What better song to represent the voter anger than the unofficial campaign theme song, Twisted Sisters' "We're Not Gonna Take It" off their 1984 "Stay Hungry" album. Lead singer Dee Snider explained to UPI that the song was inspired by non other than Arnold himself.

Patriot Act, The
The USA Patriot Act was passed in the aftermath of the tragic 9/11 events in 2001. By 2003, there was increased scrutiny and denouncements of the act as infringing on citizens' basic civil liberties. Rickie Lee Jones included the jumping gospel track "Tell Somebody (Repeal the Patriot Act)" on her 2003 release "The Evening of My Best Day" to express her frustration with the act.

The 1977 Presidential Inauguration
The trend in modern presidential inaugurations was that each subsequent inauguration festivities were grander than the preceding president. Democrat Jimmy Carter, the 39th president of the United States, made an effort to reverse that trend by keeping his inauguration festivities simple. However, there still were performances by top musicians. On the eve of the inauguration Aretha Franklin, Loretta Lynn and Linda Ronstadt performed on stage in the televised event on the Jan 18, 1977.

President Carter and the Southern Rockers
President Jimmy Carter was the 39th president of the United States. Carter hailed from Plains, Georgia and during his campaign much was made of his democratic, southern roots. Emphasizing the link musically, southern rockers the Allman Brothers Band, the Marshall Tucker Band, and the Charlie Daniels Band all attended Jimmy Carter's 1977 presidential inauguration party at the White House on Jan 19, 1977.

The 1961 Presidential Inauguration
John F Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States from 1961-1963. His Inaugural Address offered the memorable motto: "Ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country." Kennedy propelled the presidential inauguration into the media age when he decided to televise his gala in 1961. The festivities were hosted by Frank Sinatra and attended by the stars of the day, Ethel Merman and Harry Belafonte. It set the tone for modern-day inaugurations.

The 2001 Presidential Inauguration
George W Bush, the 43rd president of the United States was sworn into office on January 20, 2001. On January 18th festivities took place on the National Mall welcoming President and Mrs. Bush, Vice President and Mrs. Cheney. Some of the artists performing at the ceremony include Ricky Martin, Jon Secada, Charlotte Church and Wayne Newton. Latin heart throb, Martin, even pulled an uninhibited President Bush out of his seat to come dance with him on stage.

The 2001 Presidential Inauguration
George W Bush, the 43rd president of the United States was sworn into office on January 20, 2001. During his election campaign, Bush made much of his Texan roots. One of the hottest tickets of the inauguration festivities was the inauguration eve "Black Tie and Boots Ball." Artists featured at the event included Clint Black, Tanya Tucker, Asleep at the Wheel and Lyle Lovett.

Not In Our Name
"Not In Our Name" is an anti-war, protest EP based on the spoken word piece, "The Pledge of Resistance," by Saul Williams. The war in question is the Iraq War initiated by the United States against Iraq on March 20, 2003. The EP features guest DJ's providing variations and remixes of the pledge. The pledge starts off as "We believe that as people living in the United State it is our responsibility to resist the injustices done by our government, in our names."

The Clinton Years
William Jefferson Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States (1993-2001), provided a wealth of material for fodder for both friend and foe. The Washington-based troupe, the Capitol Steps, has put many of them to song. The covers of their album covers reference his saxophone playing ("The Joy of Sax"), his love of junk food ("Lord of the Fries"), his personal indiscretions ("Unzippin' My Doo-Dah") and his equally famous wife, Hillary Clinton ("It's Not Over 'Til the First Lady Sings!").

Tattoos
Tattoos were once considered only acceptable for the working class. At the turn of the millennium, tattoos could be found in all walks of society. One of the first album covers to prominently feature tattoos is Supertramp's second album, the 1970 "Indelibly Stampled." The examples shown here include Cerrone's 1976 "Love in C Minor," The Strangler's 1984 "Skin Deep," Tim Scott's 1983 EP "Swear" and Josh Todd's 2004 "You Made Me."

Rap Master Ronnie and Operation: Mindcrime
Ronald Regan (1911-2004) was the president of the United States from 1981-1989. He is credited with what is called the Reagan Revolution – a move to reinvigorate Americans and reduce their reliance on government. Reagan was dubbed "The Great Communicator" for his ability to express ideas and emotions during his speeches. The political cabaret "Rap Master Ronnie" was conceived of in 1984 as a way of calling attention to Reagan's America in a series of irreverent musical sketches covering everything from the moral majority, to Grenada, to homosexuality. The lyrics are by the noted political cartoonist, Gary Trudeau. In 1989, the Northwest band Queensrÿche earned critical praise for their concept album "Operation: Mindcrime" which tells the story of a disillusioned fortune hunter of Reagan-era American who joins an underground movement to assassinate corrupt political figures.

Richard Nixon Inspired Music
Richard Milhous Nixon was the 37th president of the United States, serving between 1969 and 1974. Nixon will always be remembered as the only U.S. president to resign from office (August 9, 1974) due to his involvement in the Watergate scandal. To many, Nixon was the personification of corrupt adult authority. Many rock songs mentioned Nixon. Stevie Wonder made no secret that his "He's Misstra Know-It-All" (on his 1973 "Innervisions" album) was directed at Nixon. Gil-Scott Heron's progressive poetry piece about Watergate entitled "H20 Blues" appeared on his 1973 "Winter in America." Lambchop's 2000 release "Nixon" was is reported to have been inspired by the former president and includes a suggested reading list of Nixon-related books in the liner notes.

Carole King Stumps For a New President
Singer/songwriter Carole King performed at the Democratic National Convention in 2004 singing one her hits, "You've Got a Friend" (which first appeared on your landmark album, 1971's "Tapestry"). King campaigned across the country in support of John Kerry's presidential bid starting in 2003 urging voters to educate themselves on the decisions facing the country. She believes that once voters do their homework then they will make the right decision.
Associated Albums
D'Lectrified Complicated Ride With Bob Road to Ensenada
Further Exploration
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