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Led Zeppelin IVBat Out of Hell
Description
General Motors Music Licensing

Led Zeppelin’s song "Rock & Roll" from their 1971 "Led Zeppelin IV" album was used in a 2002 General Motors ad to spark sales for Cadillac. This was the first time Led Zeppelin licensed a song to promote a product. GM also tapped '70s rocker, Meat Loaf, to use his signature tune "Paradise by the Dashboard Light" from his 1978 "Bat Out of Hell" album. As record sales fell in the 1990s and into the 2000s, artists and record labels increasingly turned to music licensing to counter flagging sales and reach new audiences.

TV Commercial Music - Burger King
Getting a song played in a commercial can be a lucrative proposition for an artist. Burger King used Hot Chocolate's "You Sexy Thing" and the Partridge Family's "I Woke Up in Love This Morning" to sell chicken and breakfast sandwiches, respectively.

TV Commercial Music - Volkswagon
Using a song in commercial can be a tricky proposition, especially if the artist is the cult favorite Nick Drake. Volkswagon's 2000 ad using Drake's "Pink Moon" to sell Cabrios certainly exposes the artist to a larger audience but at what price.

TV Commercial Music - Nissan
Music used for a TV commercial is often selected for a target audience. In 2000 and 2001, car maker Nissan used three tracks from the classic 1971 Who album, "Who's Next," for ads aimed at Baby Boomers.

TV Commercial Music - AT&T
Sometimes a song just naturally fits a product or service, usually unintentionally. Madonna's 1998 "Ray of Light" and the Soup Dragon's 1990 "I'm Free" used in AT&T commercials literally illustrate the company’s Personal Network phone service.

TV Commercial Music - The Gap
One of the most musically diverse TV advertisers is the Gap, which uses music from many decades and genres. The Gap used songs such as the '50s "Jump Jive, An' Wail" by Louis Prima, the '70s "So Far Away" by Carole King, the '90s "Brimful of Asha" by Cornorshop and the '00s "The Shining" by Badly Drawn Boy, to name just a few.

Start Me Up
The energetic hit "Start Me Up" from the Rolling Stones' 1981 album "Tattoo You" was used by the Microsoft Corporation for the release of their 1995 operating system termed Windows 95. The song, licensed for a reported $12 million, was used in no doubt because it emphasized the new start button that would go on to become a prominent feature in Microsoft operating systems.

Chevrolet Music Licensing
As record sales fell in the 1990s and into the 2000s, artists and record labels increasingly turned to music licensing to counter flagging sales and reach new audiences. As if a match made in heaven, car makers in the late 1990s and early 2000s gravitated toward classic rock songs to sell their products. General Motors had Led Zeppelin and Meat Loaf. Jaguar had Sting and the Clash. However, Chevrolet was one of the first with Bob Seger's '80s steady-rocker, all-American song, "Like a Rock," from the 1986 album of the same title.

General Motors Music Licensing
Led Zeppelin’s song "Rock & Roll" from their 1971 "Led Zeppelin IV" album was used in a 2002 General Motors ad to spark sales for Cadillac. This was the first time Led Zeppelin licensed a song to promote a product. GM also tapped '70s rocker, Meat Loaf, to use his signature tune "Paradise by the Dashboard Light" from his 1978 "Bat Out of Hell" album. As record sales fell in the 1990s and into the 2000s, artists and record labels increasingly turned to music licensing to counter flagging sales and reach new audiences.

Jaguar Music Licensing
The punk-era, anti-establishment classic "London Calling," a song about a potential nuclear war when it was released in 1979, was retooled to sell Jaguars in 2002. Ex-Police member and solo artist, Sting, allowed his song "Desert Rose" off of his 1999 "Brand New Day" album to be used by Jaguar as well in 2000. After the ad began airing on U.S, the album and song climbed into the Billboard top 20 and a hit was born. As record sales fell in the 1990s and into the 2000s, artists increasingly turned to music licensing to counter flagging sales and reach new audiences.

Bob Dylan and Victoria's Secret
Bob Dylan has taken many career turns that have surprised and baffled fans and critics. In 2004, Dylan hooked up with the lingerie maker Victoria's Secret. Dylan's song "Love Sick," from his Grammy-winning 1997 album "Time Out of Mind," provides a music backdrop to the promotion of a new line of lingerie called the "Angels" collection. It marks the first time in a long career that Dylan has appeared in an ad campaign. But the trend in the late 1990s and early 2000s has been for artists such as Led Zeppelin, Sting and Peter Gabriel to license and even appear in commercials. Dylan's next album after "Time Out of Mind" was his acclaimed 2001 release, "Love and Theft."
Associated Albums
Led Zeppelin IV Bat Out of Hell
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